Cutnell & Johnson PHYSICS 6/e
Chapter Twelve: Temperature and Heat

About Temperature

Beverly Lynds, Skymath Liaison, Unidata Program Center, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO.

http://unidata.ucar.edu/staff/blynds/tmp.html

This temperature tutorialx was written for Project Skymath. The tutorial contains a historical development of temperature and the kinetic theory and includes the temperature of the universe.
There are lots of links to other sites including NASA's Cosmic background Explorer Satellite.


Temperatures on Other Planets

by By Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science Team , at Stanford and NASA.

http://nova.stanford.edu
/projects/mgs/mars-profiles.html

The Mars Global Surveyor has been mapping the temperatures on Mars since March 1999. Contains various thermo-maps of Mars ranging over this time. The high temperature on Mars is a balmy 10 degrees Celsius. Also see Venus.


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Thermometers

By Thomas Kenny at the ME Design Division, Stanford University, CA.

http://design.stanford.edu/Courses/me220
/lectures/lect08/lect_8.html

A lecture from an ME class, giving an overview of basic techniques for sensing temperature, and study some product examples. Also a brief derivation of how to measure heat flow, including resolution of the system.
Also see Temperature World.


Phase Transition Temperatures

by W. Bauer, Michigan State University.

http://lectureonline.cl.msu.edu
/~mmp/period/phase.htm

Applet for visualizing the known melting and boiling temperatures for all elements. Shown is the periodic table, where all elements are color-coded: blue for solids, yellow for liquids, and red for gases. The elements in white do not have stable isotopes, and their phase transition temperatures are not known.

Mr. Bauer has a collection of other physics applets on his site.


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Conductivity of Different Materials

By Bruce Grossan at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's World Wide Web server for the Supernova Cosmology Project.

http://www.kie.berkeley.edu
/people/bruce/therm_demo1a.html

The image shows what happens when you pour the same amount of hot water into two cups, one made of high-conductivity metal and the other made of low-conductivity ceramic. The temperature of the water inside of the mugs at the start is the same, the temperature of boiling water. Watch the temperature change.



Comments, corrections and suggestions to Dan MacIsaac

CJ 6/e Chapter Index